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Space Foundation is a collective of Yoga Pilates and Barre teachers located in the heart of Byron Bay. Owner Rochelle Claire has travelled the world studying; practicing and teaching Yoga and Pilates; and has decided to share her love for these forms of movement and breath work with the community in Byron Bay.

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Cleanliness is next to Godliness 😇Featured

barre, fitness, health, Inspiration, lifestyle, pilates, Space Foundation, yin

Patanjalis first Niyama- or Personal Observance is “Saucha” is broken down here by Kara-Leah Grant 😍

The first yama is Saucha, usually translated as purity and sometimes as cleanliness.

No matter what kind of yoga we’re doing – asana, pranayama, meditation, chanting, Bhakti yoga, Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga – we’re always working with purification. Yoga as a practice purifies our system and by extension, our lives.

This clearing out, on all levels, allows Prana (life force) or energy to flow freely. We release and dissolve all kinds of blockages.

This is what saucha is about – clearing out the dirt and removing the unnecessary. On a basic physical level it applies to how we clean ourselves. It’s the way we shower, scrape our tongues, clean our teeth, wear clean clothes and eat life-supporting, nourishing foods that move cleanly through our systems. Done daily, and with reverence, these simple practices will lay a strong foundation to our lives. We’ll feel better about ourselves.

On a deeper level, saucha shows up in our lives in other ways.

Saucha is about purity of energy, so in our homes, it’s about the way we organise and maintain our space.

Compare the feeling of walking into a zen-style room. The floor is wooden, there is a rug on the floor, aligned perfectly with the walls. Two pot plants fill separate corners. There is a sense of everything in it’s place and a place for everything. The room is light and airy.

Now walk into a cluttered lounge with furniture at haphazard angles, dirty dishes strewn around the room, weeks of newspapers stashed on the coffee table, clothes hanging over chair arms and toys strewn across the room.

How does it feel walking into each room? What is your inclination walking into each room?

In the zen-style room, my inclination is to sit and breathe. The energy of the room is pure.

In the cluttered lounge, my inclination is to clean up and find a place for everything. Then I can sit and breathe because now the energy of the room is pure.

That is saucha in action – the recognition that everything has it’s place and there is a place for everything. From that place of places, energy can flow smoothly. There is nothing to do but breathe.

There is good reason for this niyama and I notice it in my own life. Whenever I move into a house, first I have to get everything in order. It’s not a pristine manic order, but a sense of discovering where everything belongs so it can fulfill it’s function with maximum efficiency and beauty.

Living with a child means there’s often toys littering the lounge floor. But those toys have a place and when it’s time for bed, Samuel helps me put all his toys in their place. Underneath the daily messiness is a sense of order which we always return to, maybe not every single night, but most nights.

This adds a clarity to my life that makes my mind work better. I write better in a clean space. Everything flows smoother. The light of my life can shine brighter in a clean, orderly house when I’m clean and pure!

Imagine this – each of us has a light inside that shines out to the world. If the glass that surrounds that light is smudged, or blackened, our light will be dull or faded. The practice of saucha cleans the glass so the light can shine brightly.

My light-shining often takes the form of housework.

I’ve noticed that when I feel scattered or heavy I naturally do housework. I’ll start organising.

Maybe I’ll go to put something away in the fridge and notice the fridge door has smeared ketchup on it. I’ll fetch a cloth and clean that ketchup. In doing so, I’ll notice crumbs in the door shelves so take out the bottles and clean the shelves.

Half an hour later I will have completely cleaned out the fridge and arranged everything according to how we use it and how it best fits. The cleaning and ordering of my physical environment has a comparable effect on my psyche. I feel clean and ordered and clear again.

This is a completely different experience from cleaning a fridge because it ‘has to be done’. There’s almost a merging between myself and the fridge as I attend to it’s needs in the moment 😉

I known this about myself for five or so years now – that housework is meditative and therapeutic. It’s only through my study of saucha that I’m now able to put a name to my action. Making this conscious means I can choose to take action when required now – I can notice when I’m feeling out of sorts or scattered, take a look at my surroundings, and figure out what needs sorting out and cleaning. It’s brilliant!

How might saucha show up in your life?

How do you keep your body clean and pure? Your clothing? Your room? Your house? Your life?

Words and Wisdom via Kara-Leah Grant 🙏🏾

Loving MindfullyFeatured

fitness, health, Inspiration, lifestyle, Space Foundation

Well this one just about sums me up for the moment…. (being deep in my cycle 😩 but hey we are all human and one of the big upsides of this process is feeling it all (well at least thats what I tell myself on the off-days). 

Yogi-go-getter @byronbayyogi breaks it down for u here in this bite-sized snippet of whatcha need to know to keep groovin the way that only you can do #mylove. So settle into your fave chair/cushion/Turkish towel and drink this in babe ❤

There is only one of you after all- and you came here to #shinebright darling girl X

Image via @arterium

We so often waver between knowing that we are enough and the innate, biological desire to be intimate. As a woman, a long time practitioner of yoga and mindfulness, and a girl who never forgets the impossible portrayals of love in the plethora of Disney movies of her childhood, I’ve found myself in the life-long predicament of looking for love – inside and out.

And I found it – over and over again – or at least I thought I did. I found best friends, lovers, adventure companions and, eventually, someone to divulge all of the messy details of my psyche to and plan a future with. What I expected to come with these discoveries was ease. A falling into the metaphorical arms of eternal security, and a deep knowing that no matter what happens in my world, I am worthy because somebody loves me! But what I started to understand was that no matter how picture perfect my relationship is, there will always be times when I feel the earth beneath me shake – that that security is an illusion.

The yogis and spiritual masters tell us over and over again, and as I walk the path of understanding in my own life, I’ve begun to take note of these valuable lessons.

LISTEN TO YOUR BODY

One of the major benefits of a regular yoga or mindfulness practice is body awareness. Through tuning into our bodies we begin to understand how emotional tension can manifest itself in our physiology. Liz Koch (coreaware- ness.com) is an expert on the psoas muscle – a long fusiform muscle located on the side of the lumbar region. Koch says that we hold a lot of emotional tension in this area, which is why it’s not uncommon to experience strong emotions in certain yoga poses; “A primal messenger of the central nervous system, the psoas is an emotional muscle expressing what is felt deep within – what is commonly referred to as “gut feelings”. Remember the last time a relationship ended badly and thinking ‘I should have listened to my gut’? Start to trust the sensations in your body. You don’t need to immediately react to those sensations, but ultimately they may be giving you some very necessary insight into your subconscious, and you can use these insights to guide your decisions in relationships.

BE PRESENT

Modern mindfulness guru and founder of the Headspace app, Andy Puddicombe, suggests some advice for staying present during turbulent and uncertain times (and, let’s face it, love can be pretty turbulent). He recommends that instead of using our energy for wishing that a situation were different, we can put that energy into simply being – being in the moment with our self or another. When we do this our life (in relationship) “becomes a journey we are on together, day by day, discovering what is new and meeting each and every moment afresh. If we can do this, then we will experience an increasing sense of confidence, in being at ease with both comfort and discomfort, difficulty and joy.” The way to achieve this is through a simple practice of mindful meditation. “Make sure you take some time out each day”, suggests Puddicombe. When you commit to a formal practice of meditation (even a short one), it will be easier to allow negative thoughts and judgments to emerge and easily pass. Enjoy your relationships in the now and allow them to unfold organically, basking in the newness that each day brings, every day.

LEARN TO NURTURE YOUR INNER CHILD

Mindfulness master and Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh reinforces: “To take good care of ourselves, we must take care of the wounded child inside of us…if you listen every day, healing will take place.” We all carry wounds from our childhood, and these can be triggered and re-emerge in romantic relationships. When you notice yourself experiencing strong emotions in reaction to a situation in a relationship, see if you can sit with that feeling. Sometimes when we feel the urge to strongly react, we’re experiencing trauma from our past, and often this has little to do with the current situation. Take time to listen to and take care of your inner child before reacting. Hahn suggests that we can meditate on our inner child (breathing in – I see myself as a five year old child, breathing out – I smile with compassion to the five year old child in me), spend time listening to our inner child, talk to our inner child and write letters to our inner child to facilitate healing.

DON’T TAKE THINGS PERSONALLY

In his book ‘The Four Agreements’, spiritual teacher and author Don Miguel reminds us not to take things personally in relationships. He writes, “nothing others do is because of you. What others say and do is a projection of their own reality, their own dream.” When you can understand this, he goes on, “you can say, “I love you,” without fear of being ridiculed or rejected. You can ask for what you need. You can say yes – or you can say no – whatever you choose – without guilt or self-judgment. You can choose to follow your heart always.”

Modern philosopher and author of numerous books and essays on the topic of love, Alain De Botton, supports this advice, suggesting that when we find ourselves in conflict in our relationships, we should sometimes treat our partner like a child. He says, “one of the kindest things that we can do with our lover is to see them as children. And not to infantilise them, but when we’re dealing with children as parents, as adults, we’re incredibly generous in the way we interpret their behavior.  And if a child says, “I hate you,” you immediately go, okay, that’s not quite true. Probably they’re tired, they’re hungry, something’s gone wrong, their tooth hurts, something.”

LET GO

One of my favourite philosophers, J. Krishnamurti, has some enticing words of wisdom when it comes to love. He says, “the demand to be safe in relationship inevitably breeds sorrow and fear. This seeking for security is inviting insecurity.” When we rely on another to make us feel good about ourselves, we lose the ability to take control of our own self worth. We cannot force our lover into a vicious cycle of placating us – that’s not love. “Fear is not love, dependence is not love, jealousy is not love, possessiveness and domination are not love, responsibility and duty are not love, self-pity is not love, the agony of not being loved is not love, love is not the opposite of hate any more than humility is the opposite of vanity”, says Krishnamurti. He says, simply, when you are “not seeking, not wanting, not pursuing, there is no centre at all. Then there is love.” When we understand this, we can begin to see the importance of letting go in love. As the Buddha said, “you can only lose what you cling to.”

MAKE SELF-LOVE YOUR PRIORITY

“Authentic self-esteem comes not from improving your self-image but from knowing and accepting that core self within that is beautiful, wise, and loving,” explains Deepak Chopra. From this place of genuine self-love that doesn’t rely on external validation, you put yourself in the best position to love others and be loved. If you truly loved yourself, you wouldn’t need others to substantiate you. Instead, you could enjoy the delight of your own company. Develop the habit of continually asking yourself the question: What would I do if I loved myself?

Words by Jessica Humphries.

Workshop: Roll & Release

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Roll and release is a method that uses balls and blocks to massage deep into the tissues of the body, helping to increase flexibility, improve circulation, release muscular tension, eliminate pain, and much more. Register here

Workshop: Understanding the Brain Chemicals

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Join Integrative Naturopath Grace Hawkins for an introduction to the Brain Bio Chemistry – what they are & how to work with them so that you can gain more control over your responses to situations & help your body to operate at it’s optimum. Register here

Space | Power Up

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A 1 day retreat designed to invigorate your physiology and to create a shift in your psychology; preparing you for an amazing 2019. Sign up here

The Happy Chemicals | Create your State

fitness, health, lifestyle, Space Foundation

When we feel good, life is a lot easier. We feel motivated; we feel engaged and therefore more productive, and our overall sense of wellbeing is improved.  Inspired by the book  Inspired to learn more after learning about the ‘dopamine hits’ we get from screens and social media, a friend referred me to the book Meet Your Happy Chemicals by Lorettta Breuning.

Once we learn a little about the ‘Happy Chemicals’- Dopamine, Serotonin, Oxytocin, and Endorphins – what they are and how our lifestyle affects them- we gain more control over our life experience.

Dopamine

Dopamine is the do-er. It gets you on the go and you are motivated to take action towards your goals – as an added bonus you get another hit when you achieve these goals. When dopamine levels are low you may feel self-doubt, find yourself procrastinating and generally unmotivated. To increase your dopamine levels do little things to achieve a hit- ie break down tasks into bite-size chunks so you will feel good after doing them. Each time you achieve a mini-goal your dopamine levels will increase. Also allow yourself to celebrate these small achievements.

Serotonin

Seratonin is boosted when you feel important. If Serotonin is low you are likely to feel lonely or maybe depressed.  Unhealthy attention seeking is usually  done by people seeking approval or acceptance with low serotonin levels. A Daily gratitude practice is one way to naturally increase serotonin; as is sun exposure (vitamin d I s linked to the production of serotonin), just be mindful of the UV index- ie the time of day you are in the sun.

Oxytocin

Oxytocin – the love drug– is released by Both genders during orgasm and mothers realease oxytocin whilst breastfeeding. It is linked to fidelity; and you can activate it by giving someone a hug.

Endorphins

Endorphins are released to reduce pain; stress and anxiety. It acts like morphine as an analgesic or sedative. You can induce Endorphins through laughter and exercise.

Want to know more: check out ‘Meet your Happy Chemicals‘ for ways to get high naturally.

We should eat like our grandparents ate 🍎

fitness, health, Inspiration, lifestyle, Nutrition, Space Foundation

‘Cherish your children for they are the footprints you will leave behind’

-Taylor Evan Fulks

With Dr Camilla White MBBS, Holistic Health Coach IIN

 

As health conscious parents, we are passionate about gifting our children with optimal health. We tirelessly strive to make the best choices for them nutritionally, socially and environmentally. Sometimes it can feel as though we’re fighting an uphill battle when faced with supermarket aisles full of processed sugary junk, overflowing birthday piñata’s, the dubious influence of social media and ever increasing academic demands. But as primary caregivers there is no denying the profound influence we have in shaping our kids futures, so the choices we make in their early years are paramount.

‘Diets that emphasise fresh, seasonal and local whole foods are ideal for kids’, says Dr Camilla White, one of our holistic doctors who specialises in women’s and children’s health, ‘we should eat like our grandparents ate’. Adequate nutrition is an essential feature of any wellness agenda but it’s tricky to implement when we have a fussy little eater on our hands. Despite the best intentions, if our child flat out refuses to eat a variety of fresh fruit and vegetables, then they are unlikely to be getting the nutrients they need to thrive. Dr Camilla suggests the following to assist parents facing this challenge:

5 Tips for Parents of Fussy Eaters

  1. Hide the healthy stuff in a smoothie. Most kids love smoothies, it’s just like a treat. You can make green or berry smoothies with spinach, vital greens, acai, protein powder, frozen banana, mango or even some oats. Yum!
  2. Grow your own veggies and pick them together. Kids love to be involved in picking, peeling and cooking veggies that they have helped grow. It makes it way more fun.
  3. Eat together as a family. If possible eat the same meal as your kids. Leading by example is important and when kids see their parents eat healthy foods they will gradually get used to the idea. Plus it’s a great time for family connection.
  4. Keep offering the foods. Kids sometimes take time to get used to foods and may refuse it 15 times before changing their mind. Offer the food but don’t be attached to the outcome as it can create stress and intensify the issue.
  5. If all else fails, hide it in their meal. Veggies in a Spaghetti Bolognese for example.

‘A healthy microbiome is essential for immunity, digestion and absorption of nutrients’ says Dr Camilla, ‘it’s also important for managing mood disorders, depression, anxiety, ADHD and autism’. In case you’re wondering, the microbiome refers to the variety of microorganisms that dwell in our bellies. Our gut can be likened to a garden, which needs to be tended carefully to ensure that the weeds (or pathogenic bacteria) don’t overgrow and crowd out the good guys. The microbiome has been receiving a lot of attention in recent years, as practitioners have increasingly observed its undeniable role in good health. So we know that preserving or restoring gut health in our kids is a key factor in keeping them well. But how do we do that? Dr Camilla has some suggestions:

Tips for Restoring Kid’s Gut Health

  1. Avoid processed, sugary snacks where possible
  2. Grow and consume your own veggies
  3. Let kids play in the dirt. Bacteria from soil is beneficial!
  4. Enjoy home cooked meals most of the time
  5. Make sure kids drink plenty of water and consume more dietary fibre
  6. Encourage physical activity
  7. Give probiotics
  8. Feed prebiotic foods such as bone broth, kefir or kimchi. Fermented foods improve microbiome function and composition, stimulate immune function and improve production of short chain fatty acids
  9. Make gelatin gummies to heal their gut lining. You will find a bonus recipe at the end of this blog.

The Northern Rivers region poses additional challenges with its high rate of intestinal parasites such as blastocystis hominis and dientamoeba fragilis. So high in fact, that Dr Camilla estimates around 50% of kids aged 5–10 are infected with one or both of these bugs. Antibiotics wouldn’t form part of her treatment plan however, as there isn’t enough evidence to suggest that this is the best approach. Rather, she recommends investing in a good quality water filter, crowding out the bugs with a probiotic supplement and giving gut healing supplements such as vitamin C or cod liver oil. Each patient responds differently however so the treatment plan is tailored to the individual.

So we know that nutrition and the microbiome play a huge role in the health of our kids, however there are a multitude of other factors also at play if we are to view this holistically. Being a mum to two beautiful kids herself (Evie, 4 and Banjo, 18 months), Dr Camilla is passionate about ensuring that all aspects of our children’s wellbeing are considered when striving to achieve optimum health. Here are her top five recommendations for raising healthy kids:

Top 5 Tips for Raising Healthy Kids

  1. Ensure they get enough sleep. Getting plenty of sleep is essential for their brain development, growth and a strong immune system
  2. More green time, less screen time. Limiting screen time and monitoring what they’re watching is essential as is spending time in nature, having free play in parks and paddocks the way nature intended
  3. Limit sugar and processed food. Cooking healthy treats at home and limiting refined sugar to special occasions is ideal, but be mindful of keeping a balance as over restriction can be counter productive
  4. Be kind and show compassion. Kids thrive on love and respect, learn to manage your own emotions and lead by example
  5. Slow down and be present. Allow kids plenty of free play time and don’t over-schedule with extracurricular actives and homework

Adapted from Original over @ our friends The Health Lodge.

100% Pure 💕

fitness, health, Inspiration, lifestyle, pilates, Space Foundation, yin, yoga, yoga philosophy
Some might find it dancing in the Boiler Room at the BIG DAY OUT 💃🏻
I’ve felt it looking into the eye of my newborn 💕
You might have heard the whisperings of Samadhi on the ocean breeze that day you sat and cried your little heart out after another break up. You cried so hard that in the end all that was left was peace.
The yogis call it Samadhi- a state of deep and pure love.
Literally, Samadhi is to establish or make firm. Broken down, In Sanskrit, Sam means together or integrated; a towards; and dha to get, or to hold- or put together to acquire integration, wholeness or truth.It is the eighth and final Limb of Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras, with three intensities or depths:
  1. Laja Samadhi- latent or potential level- begins in deep meditation or trance, or dancing. I think when I let go and surrender to god or am in Isvara Pranidhana and have complete trust I achieve this- that knowing feeling of grace and true trust and wonderment at life. It is a state of joy, deep and general well being. Dancing to my favourite band; looking at my newborn; in my mothers arms; in my favourite yoga pose, being adjusted by one of my wonderful yoga teachers- embodying love
  2. Savikalpa Samadhi- initial temporary state of full Samadhi. The conscious mind is still active and so is your imagination. The mind is quiet and has released desires, we get a taste of bliss; beingness but we might still be attached with the body and the attractions of the world. This might be momentary in svanasana after a massive yoga class where you were consistent and true and practised with integrity.
  3. Nirvikalpa Samadhi(orSahaja Samadhi)- end result. The mind is under control- no more desires or wishes, everything is one. Pure awareness remains ; nothing is missing – pure Wholeness and Perfection. – Pure bliss- not only feeling it but being the bliss- you’ve achieved the union(Yoke,or yoga)! and love- your heart is larger than the universe itself- or it is the universe. All cells of the physical body are flooded with the Ocean of Divine Love and Divine Bliss for any period of duration—hours, days, weeks, until you shift your awareness from the soul back to the physical body. Strange happenings may occur- better health as divine grace sustains the body, better feelings; and miraculous happenings may occur in connection with the Enlightened one. It’s possible to stay in Nirvikalpa Samadhi whilst being functional in our world.
Following these three levels, comes Mahasamadhi (ór great samadhi)–namely death or Nirvana. The final departure from every infinitesimal piece of attachment or karma as complete surrender unto God occurs and we are and dissolved into the divine. We transcend to worlds beyond karma and return to God, merging into transcendental Bliss.
A master said-‘Above the toil of life my soul is a bird of fire winging the Infinite’.
How can you invoke bliss, infinite possibilities and be in peace today? In each posture, each breath, each thought? How can you move to let go of desire, attachment to an outcome, to surrender to bliss and transmute into that bliss.
Love and blessings,
Rochelle

Seeking Samadhi (almost there 😉)

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 shares her thoughts on Dharana and Dhyana – the 6th and 7th Limbs in the Astanga Yoga System

The most-revered ancient sourcebook for yoga practice, Patanjali’s Yoga Sutra describes how the mind works and how we can integrate yoga into our lives. Patanjali’s ashtanga yoga includes eight components of practice (“ashtanga” means “eight-limbed” in Sanskrit), and dharana, or concentration is the sixth of these eight limbs. The seventh limb is dhyana, or meditation, and the eighth and final limb is samadhi, or enlightenment. These last three limbs are often studied together and are called antaratma sadhana, or the innermost quest.

By definition, this focus cures the inner conflicts we so commonly experience. When you’re completely focused, you can’t be of two minds about something.

Like many people, I’ve found that when there’s a disparity between my actions and my thoughts I become more fatigued and feel less joy in my life. But I don’t feel conflict—even though I may encounter difficulties—when I’m truly focused on and committed to the moment.

This ability to focus all the mind’s attention toward one thing is the foundation of the next limb—dhyana or meditation—and is absolutely necessary if the practitioner is to reach the liberation of samadhi. One way to understand the distinction between concentration and meditation is by using rain as an analogy. When rain starts, the moisture of clouds and fog (everyday awareness) coalesces into concentrated moisture and becomes distinct raindrops. These raindrops represent dharana—intermittent moments of focused attention. When the rain falls to earth and creates a river, the merging of the individual raindrops into one stream is like dhyana or meditation. The separate raindrops merge into one continuous flow, just as individual moments of dharana merge into the uninterrupted focus of meditation. In English, we often use the word “meditate” to mean “to think,” but in yoga, meditation is not thinking; instead, it is a deep sense of unity with an object or activity.

Yoga students are often taught to meditate by focusing on a mantra, on the breath, or perhaps on the image of a guru or great teacher. These practices are extremely difficult because it is the nature of the mind to jump around from idea to idea, from sensation to sensation. In fact, Swami Vivekananda called the mind “a drunken monkey” when he introduced meditation to the United States at the end of the nineteenth century.

Once you’ve taken the first step of learning to still the body for meditation, you can’t help but notice how “un-still” the mind is. So instead of thinking of meditation as some dreamy state in which thoughts do not happen at all—instead of trying to quiet something that by nature is never quiet—I pay total attention to the agitations which are my thoughts. My thoughts may continue, but paying uninterrupted attention to my thoughts is itself the meditation.